Wednesday Lensday: Beach Bubble!

Wednesday Lensday: Beach Bubble!

Bubbles.

Once just a whimsical plaything, fascinating all ages or a sticky signal of indifference from bolshie teenagers, full of Ennui. Now, bubbles are synonymous with the pandemic, in the UK at least.

But no, the title of this post isn’t referring to one of Boris’ illogical ‘Get-out-of-Lockdown-free’ guidelines – it’s something far more entertaining. My new toy!

Our first visit to the local beach since… probably last year…was accompanied by a lensball. A nifty, spherical lens that encapsulates the image, as if in a bubble. They’re all the rage on Insta… well maybe if we were still in 2018. I feel I’m late to the party, as usual!

Thankfully, our beach was empty except for a few dog walkers, so we were safe from being swallowed into a giant pool of human bacteria, like the beaches in Southern England last week.

It was probably down to the good old Blighty weather taking a turn for the decidedly chillier, so kudos to the family behaving like it was the Riviera, in swimsuits and with a full picnic, whilst the rest of us trudged past with coats zipped up to our noses!

However, it was also a benefit not having the sun blazing as I have it on good authority the lensball heats up pretty quickly and can burn your fingers like a spider caught in the glare of a sadistic 8 year old’s magnifying glass…

Anyway, it’s a little trickier to work with than I imagined, such as lining it up if capturing the horizon, but I’m pretty happy with my first attempts and look forward to what else I can create with it.

An added interest to our visit was seeing this poor chap – talk about having a good side for the camera. The other angle was not pretty… missing eye and dismembered fins 😦 Apparently, they regularly wash up on our shores after a storm.

Question: When a a cat also a dog?

Answer: When it’s a fish…

Another discovery was a piece of history. This section of the east coast is renowned for the amount of fossils it holds but having been several times over the years, I’ve never found one. Until this time! Meet Amelie the Ammonite with her friend, Happy Pebble.

What? You don’t name your inanimate objects? You’re missing out…

Once we were home, I had the notion to play around with the images and came up with this:

I still need to refine my Photoshop skills, but like the idea the ‘ball shape’ could be incorporated into something more creative.

And if all else fails, it’s basically a mini crystal ball. I’m available for Zoom readings every second Tuesday… 😉

Stay safe everyone!


IMAGE CREDITS: All my own so please be sweet and ask before sharing!

Wednesday Lensday: A Game of Stones

Wednesday Lensday: A Game of Stones

Rock Balancing. So that’s a thing.

And it does exactly as it says on the tin: take some rocks and balance them on top of one another. It seems to have become quite popular in the last few years, being a way to focus the mind and a form of relaxation.

Unless they keep falling down, then it has the opposite effect!

Anyway, when we were at the beach the other day, I noticed several people indulging in the pastime, except all they were doing was finding the flattest stones possible and stacking them like pancakes.

If I’ve learned anything of the art form from the images on Instagram, it’s that you need to build them in tricky ways, such as resting a large pebble, to wobble around precariously on the pointy edge of a triangular one. No glue allowed!

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So I thought I’d have a go – I reckoned I could at least manage a few perpendicular arrangements. I’m all about rakish angles!

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Et voila! Maybe I’ll try dry stone walling next… 😉

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IMAGE CREDITS: All my own, so please ask before sharing. 🙂

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Opera House? No, Opera Bridge!

Opera House? No, Opera Bridge!

Like many people, I love a good bridge. I’d like to give some poetic reason, such as they’re symbolic of links between points in our life journey, but the simple truth is I just find them structurally appealing. Strong architectural lines with the added bonus of generally being near another personal favourite, water.

I’m lucky enough to live very close to the Humber Bridge, once the longest single-span suspension bridge in the world. Its arrival in the early 1980s put it firmly on the map as an iconic local landmark, for many, a comforting signal of home as it looms on the horizon after a long trip.

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Seeing as I’m also a big fan of classical music, it was a given that I wanted to get tickets when the City of Culture team announced an event in conjunction with Opera North to walk the bridge to a unique, specially composed soundtrack: The Height of the Reeds.

Unfortunately, as tickets were free, they went swiftly and I lost out. Then, hurrah! They announced it had been so popular they were extending the run and this time I was in, albeit alone as we could only get hold of one ticket.

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So yesterday, amidst the extraordinary heat we’re experiencing at the moment in the UK, I set off for a 5K trundle.

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A Journey Through Fire and Ice: Part 4

A Journey Through Fire and Ice: Part 4

Rooooooxanne! You don’t have to put on the red light…

Nope, hold on. That’s not the Police song I had in mind for this blog post.

You see, on our last day in Iceland you’d be forgiven for thinking we were actually ‘Walking on the Moon‘!

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Growing up in Yorkshire, I have been spoilt with scenery and much of Iceland’s landscape could be likened to parts of the Yorkshire Moors and Scottish Highlands. However, the Reykjanes Peninsula Geopark is completely different, and in my opinion, severely under-advertised.

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A Journey Through Fire and Ice: Part 2

A Journey Through Fire and Ice: Part 2

Before our Icelandic adventure, I’d researched and researched and…researched some more! The Golden Circle and Northern Lights tours always came up top, along with attractions such as whale watching or extreme snowmobiling over a glacier.

But we wanted to explore by car and fortunately, thanks to Tom from Old England to New England, I was alerted to the South Coast of Iceland route, down towards Vik.

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A little more investigation showed this would be possible within a day and was home to some of the most photographed waterfalls in the country. In fact, it’s widely regarded as one of the most scenic drives out of Reykjavik. Oh, and it passes THAT volcano. So off we went!

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